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Carlos Fenollosa

Carlos Fenollosa

Engineer, developer, entrepreneur

Carlos Fenollosa — Blog

Thoughts on science and tips for researchers who use computers

Hacking your keyboard

September 23, 2014 — Carlos Fenollosa

Some years ago I started reading on mechanical keyboards, and bought an AEKII.

Unfortunately, despite the positive reviews, I didn't like the keys at all. The sound was damp, and the key feeling was horrible. Honestly, I was expecting something similar to a Model M, and this was really a different story.

I decided to open it and take a look inside, and with the help of some people I managed to hack the sound of its keyswitches, the complicated (white) Alps. I wrote a guide and uploaded it to Github.

A few days ago I received some feedback with more ideas, and I decided to update the guide. It's amazing how you write some guide on Github that probably nobody will ever read, and some years after you can still receive comments and improve on the sound of your keyboard.

Right now I am still undecided if I go again with the AEKII with its new clicky, buckling spring like sound, or keep using the tiny Filco 67-key which allows the mouse to be much closer to your right hand when you're typing. Boy, the AEKII is huge.

Besides the hardware modifications, in the guide you will also find some scripts and ideas that you can use to redefine your keyboard, type faster, and suffer less RSI. If you're still using the vanilla Caps Lock key, please read both articles.

Tags: hardware

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